Autism Awareness - Therapy “Magic” Tricks

As of 2018, approximately 1 in 59 children will be diagnosed with autism as early as age 2 (although most aren’t diagnosed until after age 4). With the rising prevalence in Autism, it feels like most of our caseloads are being dominated by this high-need population. Fortunately, I have found some “magic” tricks to help me with my low-verbal kiddos. 

Read More

Being a Mother and a Therapist

Does my training as a therapist or School Psychologist make me a better parent? I feel that I might be more educated on child and adolescent development and have read many more parenting and self-help books then the average parent. I feel that I really have a lot of tools in my toolbox, and can deal with any situation that can arise when at work, but when at home it is a different story, especially when dealing with my own children. For my own children, I have to be their mother – I am the one who tucks them in at night with a kiss, the one who cares for them when they’re sick, and the one who loves them on a daily basis when they need my love. I wear two hats, mother and therapist, separate, but informing each other. 

Read More

Using Social Stories at School

Most people in education have heard the term “social story”.  It seems to be another one of those catch phrases particularly among the special education population.  However, have you really considered how beneficial these stories are for certain students in your schools?  Among children with identified Autism or other developmental delays, having an individualized social story can be the difference between a successful school day or a dreadful one.  These stories empower students to envision themselves doing the right thing or managing a stressful situation with greater poise. 

Read More

Diets: Teaching Children to Love What They Are Eating

I have two children and it is hard for them to try different foods, especially if it is “weird” looking to them or if the texture is different. My sister in law has three children and they love to eat their vegetables and don’t give their parents a hard time about eating what is given to them on their plate. I questioned the way I was handling my kid’s food choices and why my sister in laws children were eating so healthy and why my children were not eating vegetables like their cousins.

Read More

Behind the Scenes: What Therapists don't see

I'm sure most of us reading this are therapists who work with children and if you aren't, you might have asked yourself, "Why does this child behave this way?" "What is happening in their home that I'm not seeing?" "What has happened in their young life that makes them think this way?"

Read More

I Choose to be Happy: Self-Care in the School Setting

If you are working in education, there is a good chance that you’re a helper. As therapists and psychologists, we are great at making sure everyone around us is well and taken care of. For many, this means pouring from an empty glass. Burnout is a very real situation for many in the field of education. Burnout can be defined as “a syndrome of emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and reduced personal accomplishment that can occur among individuals who work with people in some capacity (Maslach, 1986).” So, how do you know if you’re at risk for burnout, and what do you do if it’s already happening to you?

Read More

Preschool Push-In Speech/Language Services

In light of new research and emphasis on Least Restrictive Environment (LRE), a lot of SPED departments are wanting to move towards a push-in model of services for speech and language, particularly for preschool students. This is how I provide push-in services to my Preschool students in Special Day Classes and how it can be adapted to fit general ed preschools as well.

Read More

Home Exercise Program For Families On The Go

Home exercise programs (HEPs) are customized plans that are designed to specifically target identified areas of weakness. They are typically an extension of therapy tasks that are explained and are structured in such a way that they can be practiced outside of the therapy environment. Physical Therapists, Occupational Therapists, and Speech-Language Pathologists know the golden rule that the more time an individual devotes to a specific skill, the greater their strength and/or ability will be to perform this task across a variety of settings- this is the ultimate goal for therapy. A common misconception is that HEP often take up a significant amount of time and/or that many parents/caregivers are constantly on the go with a pile of academic homework to complete in the evenings – who actually has time for additional work outside of everything else they have to do?

Read More

Dealing with Parent Denial

We want to help kids. It’s our job and it’s the reason we chose our work. Parents want the best for their children, too. However, sometimes the parent denies there’s any issue with their child’s communication. Or, when the assessment is done, the result is sometimes more serious than a parent can cope with.

Read More

6 Classroom Tips to Deal with Separation Anxiety in Children with Special Needs

Child care drop off can be difficult for children and their parents, but it may also create a challenge for child care teachers.  As the teacher, it is your responsibility to make sure every child you are caring for feels safe and comfortable in the classroom. This can be difficult when dealing with a child who is experiencing separation anxiety. If you work together with the child’s parents, however, you can quickly establish a secure routine for drop off that works for everyone.

Read More

Recent Posts

Refer A Friend Today!! Earn $1,000!