Exploring the Three Severity Levels of Autism

As you probably already know, Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) varies significantly from person to person. As its name suggeststhe condition exists on a spectrum, and a person who has ASD may require little to no therapy, moderate therapy, or extensive therapy. To help determine what the best approach is for providing assistance to someone with ASD, an individual with a diagnosis often gets designated with one of three severity levels. These levels offer guidance on the amount of support a person with the condition may require 

Level 1 “Requiring Support” 

Individuals who receive a diagnostic designation of Level 1 require a minor to moderate amount of support. For example, these individuals may be conversational but have trouble initiating social interactions or may exhibit unsuccessful responses to social overtures from othersThese individuals may also have difficulties with organization or switching between activities to an extent that interferes with their daily functioning.  

Level 2 “Requiring Substantial Support” 

Individuals designated with a Level 2 severity are considered to need a substantial amount of support. For instance, these individuals might manifest clear restricted or repetitive behaviors, and their social interactions may be highly limited to certain interests or may be marked with deficits in both verbal and nonverbal communication skills. They may have difficulty in adapting to changes in their routine, and they might show obvious distress in response to changes.  

Level 3 “Requiring Very Substantial Support” 

Individuals who receive a Level 3 severity designation require an intensive level of supportThese individuals usually have very limited social and communication skills, and they may be extremely agitated by changes to their schedule or a new environment. These individuals generally require extensive therapy and supervision 

Back to Blog

Disclaimer: The information provided in this blog is for general informational purposes only and should not be considered as professional advice. The content is based on the author's personal experiences, research, and opinions. It is always recommended to consult with a qualified professional or expert before making any decisions or taking action based on the information provided in this blog.

Related Articles

After the Diagnosis: A Family’s Step-by-Step Guide
If you have a child who has been newly diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), you may be...
Helping Your Child with Autism Thrive
If your child has recently been diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), you may be...
Autism Spectrum Disorder Through Life
Many people think of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) as a disorder of childhood, but it’s actually...