Preparing your Child with ASD for School Environments

 

Getting ready to start school is exciting, but it can also be stressful, especially if your child has Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD)For children with ASD, school can pose challenges, whether related to cognitive processing delays, sensory perception issues, or social skills deficits. Here, we offer some helpful tips to prepare both you and your child for school success  

  • Establish routines ahead of time. 
    Because children with ASD often have difficulty adjusting to changes in their schedules, it’s best not to spring these changes on your child. Instead, well before the school year, institute routines and schedules he or she is likely to encounter when school begins. Establish the right sleeping and eating schedule well before the first day of school, and endeavor to introduce your child to activities that are likely in a school setting.  

  • Become familiar with the school and staff. 
    With and without your child, visit the school and speak to the teachers, administrators, and support staff. When you go alone, you can outline your child’s needs and goals while familiarizing yourself with the educators who will be playing a major role in your child’s learning experience. Taking your child to school ahead of time can help make the first day less intimidating, as can finding ways to expose him or her to different social settings before school starts, particularly opportunities for interaction with peers. 

  • Gather information, and share it. 
    Have your child thoroughly assessed, and use this detailed information to help develop his or her IEP. Speak to the teachers about your child’s needs, and how to most effectively interact with your child. If your child will be in an integrated classroom, as the teacher to speak to the class about ASD so that the other children will have a better understanding.  


  • Rehearse, rehearse, rehearse. 
    Talk about school, tell stories from your school days, look at photos of your child’s school, and read social stories that will help your child understand what to expect. Buy new clothes and school supplies in advance of that first day, so that your child can practice using them before school starts. Go to the school just to walk around or play on the playground, to help make your child more comfortable with all that school entails. 
  • Prepare yourself as well. 
    Try not to be stressed about it, and talk to other parents so that you can feel less alone. Stay involved at the school, volunteering at school events and paying attention to what’s going on at school.  
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The Stepping Stones Group provides a range of specialized services for children with Autism Spectrum Disorder, developmental delays, and behavioral challenges. We have a team of board-certified behavioral analysts, registered behavioral technicians, paraprofessionals, and instructional aides to guide you and your child in the right direction.

 

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